DOLL

Recorded and mixed by Bruno at Onix II Studio · Barcelona
Analog Mastered by Ian Hawgood
Cover Photo by Larissa Kulik

Release date: 1st January 2018 by ad21
ONLINE PIANO SINGLE
Available digitally from:
Bandcamp | Itunes | Spotify


DOLL

Belonging to his upcoming solo album released through ad21.

Reviews


In the last decade Modern Classical has soared in popularity for both releases and artists coming through the genre. Credit can go to the likes of Frahm, Arnalds, Richter, Johannsson and labels like Erased Tapes and 130701 in helping popularize the music. You can add Argentinian Bruno Sanfilippo to the list. His earliest release dates back to 1991 and although described as New Age his Modern Classical stylings came through circa 2000 “Suite Patagonia” album. It’s fitting that this release covers his two most recent release, one “Lost & Found” is an archival compilation and the other, “Doll” is a single coming out on January 1, 2018. “Doll” is Sanfilippo’s first release for 2018 coming out on the first of January on all digital platforms. Mastered by Home Normal boss Ian Hawgood (who also mastered “Lost & Found”) the track is a meditative rolling piece that has a beautiful tone alongside its controlled playing that, while conveying an intention it is never forceful nor laid back. There is an organic feel to it with the slight sound of the parts of the piano (possibly hammers or dampers – being a non musician I can only guess). There is a certain degree of romance to the music, but also a feeling of hope. At no times is it melancholic, but just a pleasure to listen to. The feeling is of a musician in control of their art and this ease that he has comes across in the enjoyment for the listener. If this, Sanfilippo’s first entry into 2018 is a representation of what is to follow, then it should be a great year of music ahead of us.

Drifting, Almost Falling Blog

2018-04-19T19:25:32+00:00

Drifting, Almost Falling Blog

In the last decade Modern Classical has soared in popularity for both releases and artists coming through the genre. Credit can go to the likes of Frahm, Arnalds, Richter, Johannsson and labels like Erased Tapes and 130701 in helping popularize the music. You can add Argentinian Bruno Sanfilippo to the list. His earliest release dates back to 1991 and although described as New Age his Modern Classical stylings came through circa 2000 “Suite Patagonia” album. It’s fitting that this release covers his two most recent release, one “Lost & Found” is an archival compilation and the other, “Doll” is a single coming out on January 1, 2018. “Doll” is Sanfilippo’s first release for 2018 coming out on the first of January on all digital platforms. Mastered by Home Normal boss Ian Hawgood (who also mastered “Lost & Found”) the track is a meditative rolling piece that has a beautiful tone alongside its controlled playing that, while conveying an intention it is never forceful nor laid back. There is an organic feel to it with the slight sound of the parts of the piano (possibly hammers or dampers – being a non musician I can only guess). There is a certain degree of romance to the music, but also a feeling of hope. At no times is it melancholic, but just a pleasure to listen to. The feeling is of a musician in control of their art and this ease that he has comes across in the enjoyment for the listener. If this, Sanfilippo’s first entry into 2018 is a representation of what is to follow, then it should be a great year of music ahead of us.
We don’t often get video for these kind of pieces, so it was really interesting to have a visual for this one. While it earned a spot here on the music alone, I do recommend the video as well. The piano work is quite captivating. There’s a lightness to the end of each melody line, as if the harder punctuated beginning of the line is more important but the back carries more meaning. When they all thread together, though, you can’t help but feel a tingling of raw emotion from the artist to your ears.

EarToTheGround Music

2018-05-05T09:34:17+00:00

EarToTheGround Music

We don’t often get video for these kind of pieces, so it was really interesting to have a visual for this one. While it earned a spot here on the music alone, I do recommend the video as well. The piano work is quite captivating. There’s a lightness to the end of each melody line, as if the harder punctuated beginning of the line is more important but the back carries more meaning. When they all thread together, though, you can’t help but feel a tingling of raw emotion from the artist to your ears.